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20121225
20121225
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shifted. these terms are precise or scientific, but it's still useful constructs for thinking about what changed in 1962. environmentalism is different in several important ways. it's a little more pessimistic, not nearly as forward-looking and are much more immediate, urgent and dyer and with the evolution of environmental thinking, we begin to focus more and more on ourselves come over before the species of concern may be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to t
shut at 1:30 in the afternoon and open again at 5:00 p.m. carlows also uses that break for a nap, for now at least. -- carlos. >> i think soon we will have to stay open after lunch. this is a tourist area. we have to stay open because it is customer friendly even though a lot of people are against it. but business is business. >> to make sure tourists in particular are not faced with shuttered doors, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you re
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't
been upon us was telling them they're wrong. but they had the extraordinary level of intellectually ability required to acknowledge the possibility that they were wrong in a profound sense. what is the evidence that would prove i'm wrong? so when they were wrong, because zoonosis rate of the time, they could change course as lincoln did many times during the civil war. >> host: that's a rare combination. >> guest: these are characteristics captured. >> host: we are wrapping it up quickly. we just had a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signatu
historian patrick o' donnell recounts the u.s. army's second ranger battalion company, also known as "dog company". the group was composed of 68 men in a military campaign during world war ii including landing on the beaches of normandy and the ascent of point do hawk. it starts right now on booktv. [applause] >> thank you for having me here today. it is great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things of come full circle in many ways. is a trite saying that today is the bat -- anniversary of the battle of volusia where i got started as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went through an aid station in -- and al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor and cots, a situation that was interesting. i will never forget looks on the side of the wall, the light had changed. there was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had this sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed along with a member of the iraqi forces that were accompanying us. it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head, the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6